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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
reproduction system. [laughter] a lecture by tied a can and a member of the house committee on science and technology is the guy than there was a theory that on me just was not a good candidate and did not connect very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i trie
nation," we love a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury award for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of my favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon. and it will be american. >> it seems to me, first of all, from what i understand from doctors, that's really rare. if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> i stood up and said the science is bogus. the dangers of carbon dioxide? tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one person. and it goes to newt gingrich for his out-of-this-world ideas. congratulations, newt. your revvie will be waiting for you at the moon base when you get there. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, and carl rove. plus, the award for political performer of the year. you're watching the second annual revvie awards only on msnbc. jamie
a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of miff favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon and it will be american. >> first of all, if it's a legitimate rape, the fe plael body has ways to shut that whole thing double. >> the dangers of carbon dioxide. tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one pirn and it's to newt gingrich. congr congratulatio congratulations, newt. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, carl rove, plus the award for pli political performer of the year. [ thunder crashes ] [ male announcer ] if you think all batteries are the same... consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. g
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
the epa. inhof of the science committee issued a report back in october where he said the obama administration not just the epa but several agencies are working to find way to regulate the hydraulic fracturing at the federal level to stop the practice altogether. irony is fracking is one thing in the environmental -- excuse me, manufacturing sector that lifted up the economy. to the point it's not talked about exporting liquid natural gas. >> hypocrisy of the idealogue on the left. in the past coal was a big offender. they wanted to kill coal, which the epa has done. natural gas is wond evidenceful because it emit that was carbon. now coal is abolished we don't have new plans and now they are going after the natural gas. supposed to be benign. if you say it's a pendulum, it's not. ratchet. it expands. republicans can shrink it in the future you be in the end, it's inforrable and it grows. >> thank you. stay tuned for president's >>
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> joining me now is daiftd web and jason riley this, is predictable as election season comes and goes. going back to 1998, missouri, democratic party radio ad. elect republicans black churches are going burn. al gore goes for a black audience goes into preacher mode. rbi republicans don't want to count new the census. hillary clinton changes her cadence. it's predictable. they did it this election season y do they keep doing it? >> because it work autos well... i think it does work. to some extent. >> the left likes to complain but you listen to rhetoric and think that is the last thing in the world they want. take the situation we just have gone through. here, you had the nation's first black president just reelected trying to nominate the third black un ambassador to become the third black secretary of state. this would be considered fro pro gres. -- pro grechls but no. instead left -- . >> she's a woman, it's about race. >> right reduced to being a black woman instead of credentials she used to get the job. so we know the
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serus allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these stop taking chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, tell your doctor if you have new or worse symptoms. get medical help right away if you have symptoms of a heart attack. use caution when driving or opera
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ >> greg: that song doesn't work anymore. >> kimberly: yes, it does. >> greg: i hate new year's eve resolutions because they don't exist. if every predictable reporter or news reader never brought them up again you'd never hear of them. it's true. the average person doesn't consider them until a chucklehead with a cheery smile brings it up. with doris, ill open for wkab. what are you giving up this year? if she would respond with "lame reporting" with a chick to the shin or groin. why do the media do this every year? fearful of to do anything different. resolutions are a symptom. think of the trite gar banal that passes for commentary in the media. shallow attempts at psychoanalysis discussing root causes of violence. what is worse is their infatuation with symbolic. you could say that is my resolution but then you have license to punch me in the face. >> kimberly: by goodness. that is real evidence -- >> andrea: can i punch you in the face because you banned resolu
, should we think more about it. should we think more about the science about it. they are saying that we should spin off more great technology. it's another great competition. >> i love the change in mr. webb a year later. the president is basically asking, is this a top priority. and he said oh, absolutely. [laughter] >> i think he also asks how else it can be done. is there a way of doing this. perhaps this shifts from kennedy's own cold war. >> part of what i want to understand, if this meeting is taking place about a year and a half after the state of the union speech, here it is a year and a half later, and the government isn't really on board. and you think, my god. >> i can confirm that that is often the case. but the written document i've seen on display in this library, why is it being done right now? what we do in the next 24 hours. he really was on it. but i think it's worth pointing out that in 1963, which it was a very different year from 1962. but the cold war had calm down a big notch after the cuban missile crisis. and khrushchev and kennedy were working closely together
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> two monumental shifts in american culture in 2012, two states voting to legalize marijuana and same-sex marriage is legal in nine states and the district of columbia. president obama tipped the scales with the stunning announcement he now supports same-sex marriage. >> how much of it is personal, how much is political? is this a game changer? just yesterday clay aiken said he wished president obama would, quote, hurry up. you must be pretty happy that he reacted so quickly. >> i am. i feel so empowered. >> i mean, a big day, you know, every gay american, a big day for every american in america, whatever reaction you had to it. how did you feel when you heard the news? >> you know, it is a little bittersweet. i'm in north carolina and as a north carolinian, i was really disappointed with the way the amendment initiative vote went yesterday here in nort
display at the smithsonian in d.c. and the california science center in los angeles. >>> also another story we want to bring you out of florida. just check this out. unwelcome visitor at a picnic area in the everglades. look at that. family on vacation from arkansas took this video after a 17-foot burmese python was shot and killed by park rangers. the giant snakes, many of them former pets, have become a big, big, big nuisance in south florida. next month florida game officials will hold a hunting contest offering a $15,000 prize to the person who kills the most pythons. >>> all right, let's turn from snakes to flakes. the massive storm that's been causing huge problems since christmas day is finally over. maine was the last to deal with it. some places got a foot of fresh snow, but it's not over yet. meteorologist chad myers is in the cnn weather center with a look at that. so chad, you know, i thought when this storm came through, all right, fine. it wasn't so great. lots of snow. >> right. >> but it's over. not over yet. >> no, not over yet. and another one coming on its heels. an
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ oh beautiful for spacious skies for amber waves of grain ♪ ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ above the fruited plain ♪ america america god shed his grace on thee ♪ ♪ and crown thy good >> our gaggle here was almost unanimous in naming that ad as one of the most memorable and effective ads of the 2012 campaign. that's saying something in a race where nearly a billion dollars was spent on advertising alone in the presidential race. it's tough to stand out. we're all back, what was interesting here, kevin and stephanie, is both of you picked that ad as the most effective and both of you on the democratic side, and you both picked the most effective ad on the republican side. here it is. >> he tried, you tried. it's okay to make a change. >> so, i thought that was interesting. it's almost like you're respecting the other's work. kevin, you picked the america the beautiful. what -- >> i remember when that ad came out, it was previ
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
the most aboard climate science is going on. these are the most destructive fires in colorado history and they come after the warmest weather ever recorded. you could do the same exercise all over the planet. this is what it looks like as the planet begins -- and i underline begins -- to warm pita mohamed mursi had been declared the winner in each presidential race. >> we will respect agreements and international law as well as egyptian commitments and treaties with the rest of the world. >> to talk about the significance of election, we are joined by sharif of del produce. >> the first democratically elected in egypt's history. his win marks a victory over the lingering remnants of mubarak's regime. >> chief justice john roberts prove to be the surprise deciding vote. joining with the court's liberal members. >> the highest court in the land has not spoken. we will continue to implement this law and we will work together to improve on where we can. >> me state the positive first. this really is a huge victory for our side. in spite of all of my concerns with this law, it did not go f
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: is traditional america gone for good good? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. my pal dennis miller believes traditional america has been vaporized that it is gone for good. >> do i think it will ever go back to my lifetime in the other way no, i don't. i think this is it. do i think it's the mercury saw from 18 to 58? no, i don't. is that the end of the world? , no it's not like i was in the shower this morning and find a lump in my armpit. that's always my fall back position. i have got a great life. but i'm just saying it is not the mercury have grown comfortable with. >> bill: i have given miller's election take a lot of thought. and i disagree with him. i believe traditional america can come back but it will take a very special person to make that happen. let's look at what happened. president obama received about 62 million votes. 11% less than he got in 2008. so he is slipping in popularity. mitt romney endedo u
they normally wear. it was just like a science-fiction moment. it's like, what happened to all the men? i became curious about that. because i am a reporter, you know that once you get an idea in your head and you really can't let go. as a friend of this woman in the supermarket, her name was bethany, i bumped into her and started talking. i said, what's up? are you married? she was not married. though she had a daughter. and she began to talk to me about the guy was the father of her daughter and how -- she herself was working, she was going to school to become a nurse, she was raising a child and she began to talk about things in a disparaging way. which is well we don't live with calvin because he would be another mouth to feed. that was her argument. of course, she and i had a sisterhood bonding at that moment. but i wanted to know who calvin lies. so i got his phone number and calvin and i started at become friends. what happened to these men? what's going to happen to them? i don't know if you know that old ladies home journal column, can this marriage be saved, where you try to figure out
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> good morning. i'm victor blackwell in for carol costello. stories we're watching in "the newsroom" the opening bell at the new york stock exchange rang just a few seconds ago. stocks are poised to open with lower, open lower rather with much of their attention still focused on that fiscal cliff. ringing the opening bell today the startup weekend leadership team. >>> tributes are pouring in this morning for retired general norman schwarzkopf, stormin' norman as he was known died yesterday. he became a household name in the '90s as he led america to victory as commander of coalition forces during the first gulf war. schwarzkopf was 78. >>> craft store giant hobby lobby is bracing for a $1.3 million a day fine. it starts january 1st for bucking some of the rules in the affordable health care law. you see the company opposes providing some contraceptives to its employees tough its company health care plan citing religious grounds. the company says some contraceptive pro
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. stuart: we are getting some reports of quote optimism and significant progress in the fiscal cliff talks. let's bring in peter barnes who is close to these talks. what do you make of it, optimism? you're looking away from me. look me in the eyes there. [laughter] peter: getting all the e-mails all of a sudden now. we have got all this optimism, all this significant progress, progress aides close to the talks between vice president biden and republican leader mitch mcconnell say there is significant progress. some senior republican aide says progress but not done. republican senators express optimism. a senate democratic leader harry reid on his way into the building expressed optimism. stuart: but peter it is only optimism for this super narrow, narrow deal where there's simply a number thrown out there, 400,000 or 500,000 or 250,000 and above that level you pay more tax, below it you don't. that's all it is, isn't it? that's all. peter: yeah, so far. i think that part of the -- part of the head winds, part of the problems with this deal
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
because, of course, this is science hour, of course, but i was just reading up on this, but, you know, in rats, even in dogs and other animals, the calorie-restricted diets do increase the life span by one-third. they did a study on primates. it doesn't seem to actually translate to primates. therefore, people are assuming it doesn't translate to humans. >> just read this story because you want to have it in context. it does not mean you eat bgarbae that's out there. >> obviously you have to eat right. the book you're writing, there's some people that actually eat well are never hungry. maybe slightly overweight, but they eat healthy. those people are fine. >> yeah. and that's a hard diet to accomplish in the food environment that we live in, which is what i'm writing about. >> not if you wrap it all with bacon which is what i do. >> you have a resolution. >> what is the resolution? >> he's going to lose weight. he's going to get in really good shape. >> i think i'm looking pretty good right now. >> right. >> you look slightly overweight. >> i'm doing all right. >>> with us now, chief
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)